Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Award-winning Keynote Speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard has a thought-provoking approach to what leadership in a globalised world is all about. As a leadership keynote speaker, he is not afraid of pointing out weaknesses and to suggest solutions beyond what you read in leadership and management textbooks. You will not be bored!

Leadership keynote speaker Finn Majlergaard

Re-energise your Team with an interactive inspirational speech or a tailored workshop from a global leadership keynote speaker 

  • To kick-off an organisational change process
  • To re-energise a culturally diverse team
  • To boost innovation in a culturally diverse team
  • To facilitate feedback on organisational effectiveness
  • To identify cultural strengths and weaknesses

Presentation sample

Here is a sample of Leadership keynote speaker Finn Majlergaard presenting a  speech at Entrepreneur India conference 2017 in New Delhi

Some of the topics Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard covers

(Click on each topic to learn more)

How Artificial Intelligence will change Corporate Culture

Book a thought-provoking Speech on Artificial Intelligence and Company Culture

What happens when the hero in the organisation is no longer a senior person but a computer? What happens when your boss tells you that he trust the computer more than he trusts you? What happens when you get fired because your job can be better done by a computer?

Artificial Intelligence is going to change our lives dramatically in the years to come. In many areas, we already acknowledge that humans make more errors than computers. The reason why air travel has become so safe is mainly that computers have taken over the control of the plane. We could operate aircraft without anyone in the cockpit, but we are not there – yet!

Would you fly a plane without pilots if you could get a discount?

But how does artificial intelligence affect our company culture? Most people have a desire to become better at what they are doing – partly because they then get recognition and perhaps even a pay raise. For most people a job is not just a job – it is a part of our identity.

What happens when your experience and intuition is becoming obsolete because the computer can make better decisions faster based on big data and multi-faceted analysis?

How will that affect our motivation, our desire to make an effort?

We can also change the attitude and find out how we can become better, have more fun, get more opportunities my embracing artificial intelligence. See it as a partner rather than a competitor.

But what if our new best friend – the artificial intelligence – decides to make us redundant?

We need to be conscious of the dilemmas!

Leadership keynote speaker Finn Majlergaard

Leadership keynote speaker Finn Majlergaard

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will not argue for or against artificial intelligence. He will outline a number of important dilemmas we have to relate to. We human beings are social creatures. We need affiliation, we need recognition, we need feeling safe. If these crucial elements are taken away from us it can take down any company. Once you have ruined your company culture it cannot be rebuilt easily.

This interactive speech lasts from 1 to 1,5 hours but can also be extended into a 3-hour workshop.

Turning Cultural Diversity into your biggest asset
In most organisations, there is an internal rivalry between the different functions, locations, professions etc. This rivalry between the different subcultures serves the purpose of shaping the identity of each function, location and profession. A healthy rivalry is good but when it gets out of hand it drains the organisation for positive energy, momentum and ability to perform.

In this interactive speech Leadership keynote speaker, Dr Finn Majlergaard will address why we end up in such a situation and what we can do to get out of it again. He will use both real-life examples and academia when addressing this issue. He will also include examples where Gugin has been asked to help out to illustrate how difficult a cultural turn-around can be if you think it will go away by itself.

How to prepare the organisation for change
We like change as long as it is other people who have to change. when it comes to ourselves we are very resistant. Our fear of change is very deeply rooted so it takes a lot more than a powerpoint presentation to actually make people change behaviour, direction or values.

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will address how we can create a culture that makes it safer for people to change – to try something new. The first step is to understand the nature of fear and how fear influences our behaviour. We are not rational machines but emotional creatures predominantly motivated by fear. The second step is to assess what we are afraid of and make that conscious. The third and final step is creating an environment – a culture, whare we have the courage to overcome that fear.

In this interactive speech, you will be guided through these steps spiced up with examples and short exercises.

How to solve cultural conflicts the intelligent way
Usually, when we have a conflict of interests we aim at a compromise. But a compromise is actually the worst possible solution because none of the parties involved gets what they aimed at in the beginning. That makes the solution very unstable because the parties will always try to get a better deal if an opportunity arises.

We pursue compromises because we believe that it is the best possible solution. But it is not!

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will guide you into a different concept – reconciliation. A reconciliation differs from a compromise by leveraging the differences to achieve a solution none of the parties could have achieved on their own.

In other aspects of life, we often use the phrase “I couldn’t have done it without you” often. It is not any different in business in politics but we are not trained to see it that way.

After the speech, you will have a set of tools that enable you to start changing the way you solve conflicts. A way that will lead you towards more stable, sustainable solutions that leverages the diversity instead of fighting it.

Global cultural challenges for the aviation and hospitality industries
The rise of emerging and frontier markets provides a lot of opportunities for both local and global businesses. If you are selling a product you get access to new markets you can develop and grow. If however, you are in the aviation or hospitality industry it is far more complex.

Most global airlines see huge growth potential in emerging and frontier markets because the economic growth develops a middle class that will travel for both business and pleasure. The big hotel chains can see the same thing.

This new middle class will behave very differently in airports, in aeroplanes and in hotels. How do you prepare for that as an airline, an airport or a hotel chain who want to expand successfully in these new markets?

Another cultural challenge for the aviation and hospitality industry is the fast-growing number of elderly people who continue to travel even with limited mobility. How do as an airport tackle that in an environment where a lot of people are hurrying around, are late for planes and require a fast access to the arrival gate? And how do you tackle it onboard the plane where boarding end de-boarding will take a lot longer time. The rise of frustrations is easy to spot.

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will outline the consequences for the aviation and hospitality industry when the new middle classes start to travel in big numbers at the same time as we have an ageing population that continues to travel because they can afford it.

Improve collaboration and boost effectiveness and innovation in the healthcare industry
Facilitating cultural change in the healthcare industry can be challenging because we on one side have the experienced doctors who promote the best practices we are comfortable with and on the other side we have the younger doctors who promote all the new opportunities the new technology gives us. This work is about how we can reconcile this dilemma so both the older and younger doctors and the patients benefit from the reconciliation.

So the question is: How can we Improve collaboration and boost effectiveness and innovation in the healthcare industry so that the older, experienced doctors don’t block all technological improvements and the younger, less experienced doctors don’t rely entirely on a new technology that might not work properly?

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will address the implications of this generation clash and outline the cultural values the two generations have. He will then – illustrated by examples – suggest a new path for hospitals and healthcare clinics. It will be a path that leads to a situation where experience and thirst for innovation go hand in hand towards new goals. These goals are increased client and employee satisfaction, increased efficiency, increased profitability and increased organisational effectiveness.

Anybody can copy your product - but no one can copy your culture
Anybody can copy your product – but no one can copy your culture is something that should stay on the top of every business owners head. Most businesses are very conscious of their financial and market performance. Very few companies are conscious of how well their corporate culture supports their business objectives.

When we in Gugin do a cultural assessment of a company we very often find that the corporate culture is counterproductive to what the company tries to achieve.

  1. Having the culture on top of the agenda has a number of other advantages.
  2. Customers will buy your products – not because of the specifications, but because they want to be associated with your company culture
  3. Employees will stay – for less – because they value the working environment</li><li>Customers are more likely to forgive you when you make a mistake if you have a culture they admire</l

In this speech,an> Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will talk about the importance of having a strong corporate culture, how you assess if you have one and how you get on the track developing an even stronger corporate culture

Get a speech tailored to meet your specific needs by a globally experienced leadership keynote speaker

How will massive automation and surveillance shape our culture?
It is already there – the automation, Internet of Things, self-driving cars, artificial intelligence etc. Some people tend to embrace the automation and fall in love with every new development while others seem to be more sceptical.

But no matter what your standpoint is, it will affect the way we are together, the way we communicate and by that the culture we are part of. It is already a fact that many children have problems de-coding other peoples non-verbal communication because these children spend so much time in front of iPads and other electronic devices. What will happen to them later in life? Some researcher er convinced that these children will live alone because they don’t know how to form social relations in real life. And what kind of culture does it give us?

In this speech, Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard will address a number of scenarios and outline possible cultural changes we might see. As frightening/promising as the future might look like it is, however, a fact that it is too late to put the toothpaste back in the tube.

Inspirational speech

Let your team get new inspiration on how to leverage the cultural diversity and build on the strong culture you already have. Anyone can copy your product but no one can copy your culture

Prepare for change

Develop the cultural skills of your team. No only will you avoid cultural conflicts in the future you will learn how to leverage cultural diversity. It will make you more productive, more innovative and make your company more attactive for future employees, investors and other external stakeholders.

See our 12 1/2 day intensive modules here

Clearing the air

Are you in that unfortunate situation that your team is not working well together? Let Gugin bring you back on track with a 1/2-day intensive workshop with a tailored follow-up program. Read more here.

All speeches and masterclasses are customised to your needs. Depending on the situation the participants might be asked to answer some questions or participate in an interview with one of Gugin’s researchers. We do that to ensure we address the most important issues and deliver as much value as possible to you.

Interested?

Contact us today and tell us how we can help you

Leadership keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard

Biography

Award-winning keynote speaker Dr Finn Majlergaard is the founder and CEO of Gugin – a global operating consulting and training firm. Gugin is specialised in creating winning corporate cultures for companies and organisations around the world.

Dr Finn Majlergaard delivers thought-provoking speeches to any audience. His purpose is to make people think outside the box by leveraging the cultural diversity.  It will not be boring! He spends a lot of time on preparation every time, so you get a right to the point speech.

He founded the company in 2001 and he and his colleagues have worked with hundreds of companies and organisations in 5 continents.

He is also an entrepreneur and has founded several companies including Educated Singles and Find Supervisor

Dr Finn Majlergaard teaches at several business schools and universities around the world and he facilitates several executive leadership classes at world leading business schools, among them HEC Executive Education in Paris.

He has published two books on leveraging cultural diversity and how to create competitive advantage from cultural diversity. They can be found on all major online bookstores

He is also a member of the Society of Industry leaders and a fellow at The World Certification Institute.

Education

Finn Majlergaard holds a doctoral degree from International School of Management in Paris, New York, Tokyo and Shanghai. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on how to create competitive advantage from cultural diversity. He also holds an MBA from Henley Management College, UK and he wrote his MBA dissertation on how to motivate and reward multicultural teams in the most effective way.

Prior to founding Gugin, Finn Majlergaard had senior management positions in global companies like IBM, CSC and Arthur Andersen Business Consulting.

When we accept behaviour today we wouldn’t accept before

When we accept behaviour today we wouldn’t accept before

Why we accept behaviour we didn’t accept before

Unlike what we might initially think cultural values change over time. That is the truth for any culture – in fact no culture would be able to survice if it didn’t adapt to the external environment all the time. When I was a little boy a zilion years ago it was the norm that people smoked everywhere. Both my parents were smoking everywhere – also in the car when we were driving somewhere despite I got tears in my eyes. People were smoking onboard airplanes. Both examples illustrate how the cultural norms have changed for the better. We have become wiser and that wisdom has influenced our behaviour.

That is usually how cultures develop. They progress because we get wiser. Unfortunately it sometimes goes the other way too – that we accept behaviour we didn’t accept before.

Not all cultural changes are driven by wisdom

Unlike the changes described above, where behavioural change was driven by increased wisdon we have another type of cultural changes. These changes are driven by people or organisations who have the power and means to influence and manipulate a group of people. That can be a group of employees, an ethnic group, a country’s population, a social group  – literally any group.

Throughout history religious leaders have succeeded in manipulating their followers by playing on fear. Fear is by far our most influental motivation factor and if you understand how powerful it is you can gain a lot of influence. Religious leaders were the first ones to discover the power of fear. They still exercise it to some extend in some parts of the world. But politicians have taken over as the dominant group to use fear as a mean to manipulate groups of people. When you become good at that you can actually initiate a cultural change.

Over the years I have seen several organisations where managment maintained a certain level of fear among the employees in order for them to work harder or exercise a certain behaviour. A lot of parents use fear (in a mild form) when raising their children.

Donald Trump is the most prominant example of how well fear works. He exercise a behaviour no one would have accepted before. Barack Obama received the Nobel peace prize largely because the Bush era was over. Today most people would be grateful to have George Bush back.

Trump has successfully managed to impose a fear in the lower middle class USA, so that they see him as a saviour despite he does absolutely nothing for their social group. They accept his behaviour and his politic despite it contradicts all their own interests. They do it because they feel and think that they have to live with that behaviour in order to be protected from that imaginary fear that has been imposed on them.

It is the same reason why some people accept being abused or stressed out at work to an extend where they get seriously ill.

What will happen when Trump is gone?

Will we go back to the “old” normal or will the presidency have changed forever? I believe we have developed a new normal. Hopefully we will not get a new Trump type but the next president will be able to get away with a lot more than any other president before Trump.

Is it good or bad? In this case I think it is extremely bad because it is not a cultural change initiated by a need of the society or new wisdom, but purely by a single person’s greed and his lack of interpersonal skills.

Hopefully the politicians will see it as a wake-up call for modernising the political system, so that this can’t happen again.

There are Trumps everywhere

There are trumps everywhere, as CEO of companies, as religious leaders, a political leaders, as parents – everywhere. They are usually harmless because they only influence a smaller group of people.

How do we get wisdom and knowledge back as the driver for cultural change?

On a global scale most cultural change is driven by wisdom and knowledge. Don’t forget that. When we change behaviour because we realise the old behaviour was harmful, when we work on developing democratic institutions as replacements for conflicts, when we invest in education and so on, we motivate behavioural change because of wisdom and knowledge. And that will continue.

How do you make sure you influence the culture of your organisation the right way?

Before you can assess whether or not your are influencing yout culture the right way you need to have an idea of what the ideal culture would look like. Gugin can help you make that idea visible and tangible through our cultural due diligence process where we assess and evaluate a large number of papameters that together form what we call the Cultural DNA.

When you have the ideal cultural DNA you can compare it with the actual cultural DNA. That compasison will give you an idea of when cultural change processes are most important and you will have the key indicators for measuring the progress.

Gugin can facilitate that process together with you. We will do that based on our cultural DNA framework which we started to develop in 2004. The framework is in a constant finetuning process as the world is change all the time.

We look forward to hear from you.

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

A lot of people want to become a leader. This article is about why you most likely will fail to become a leader. The article is also about what you can do yourself to change that situation. But you will probably find it is much harder than you anticipated.

read more
Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership keynote speaker, Dr Finn Majlergaard delivers thought-provoking global leadership speeches and workshops all over the world, based on 25 years of experience with 600+ companies. Anyone can copy your product but no one can copy your culture. Learn to become the best in leadership

read more

Poll: Who is the greatest threat to world peace, Trump, Putin or Kim Jong-Un?

Poll: Who is the greatest threat to world peace, Trump, Putin or Kim Jong-Un?

Trump, Putin or Kim Jong-Un

3 people who gain global attention. 3 people who almost everybody have an opinion about. Before we continue we will like to hear your opinion by answering the short poll below. We will also be grateful if you will share this page so we can get as many answers as possible. We will deal with the results and the comments in the upcoming newsletter, so please sign up in order to stay informed.

First, please take the poll below

 

[socialpoll id=”2476166″]

Was it difficult?

Was it difficult to choose between Trump, Putin or Kim Jong-Un? Probably not as our preferences are very dependent on our geographical location and cultural affiliation.

This poll might seem as a harmless poll with no deeper purpose. But there is a deepr purpose.

Cultural Intelligence prevents nuclear wars!

One of the key learning points in all the training we do in Gugin is that everything we do we do for a reason. And everything we do make sense to ourselves. It might not make sense to anyone else, but it makes sense to us. At least at the time where we do it.

If you have cultural intelligence you will understand why people express themselves, act and behave the way they do. You don’t have to accept it, but you must have the capability of understanding other people’s behaviour.

If you do – or are interested in learning it you will find out that we can solve problems in much more intelligent and peaceful ways. The people living in North Korea, Russi and USA pretty much have the same aspirations in life. The all love their children, they all want to live in peace, they all want to do it better than the previous generations. But they also have fear. We all do.

When we have fear we are easy to manipulate by people who know how to do it. Trump, Putin and Kim Jong-Un all master that skill. That is why they have an interest in threatening with nuclear war and paint images of others as being a huge threat to their own country. And war is after all good business for the few and devastating for the many. YOU probably belong to the many, so you have both the responsibility and the means to change direction.

You might of course also be one of the many who truly believe that world is black and white. That choice is of course entirely yours, but that is the only choice I don’t respect

Interested in elevating your level of cultural intelligence?

If you are interested in learing how to benefit from the cultural diversity and learn how to avoid cultural conflicts from escalating then have a look at our courses here.

You can also take the introductory course on Gugin.online. Not only can you take the course you also have the option of getting certified afterwards.

PS: You can add your comments at the bottom

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

A lot of people want to become a leader. This article is about why you most likely will fail to become a leader. The article is also about what you can do yourself to change that situation. But you will probably find it is much harder than you anticipated.

read more
Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership keynote speaker, Dr Finn Majlergaard delivers thought-provoking global leadership speeches and workshops all over the world, based on 25 years of experience with 600+ companies. Anyone can copy your product but no one can copy your culture. Learn to become the best in leadership

read more

Artificial Intelligence :: How not to destroy your company culture

Artificial Intelligence :: How not to destroy your company culture

This article is about how artificial intelligence will affect company cultures. What happens when the hero in the organisation is no longer a senior person but a computer? What happens when your boss tells you that he trust the computer more than he trusts you? What happens when you get fired because your job can be better done by a computer?

Uncertainty, fear and opportunities surround artificial intelligence

Artificial intelligence is not new. We just talk more about it and it is moving into areas where it directly affects more people’s lives. The driverless car is an example. They have the potential to be able to eliminate the majority of all accidents on the road. So now you can drink and drive without the risk of hurting anybody. We like that idea because it obviously helps us. We have known this kind of artificial intelligence from the aviation industry for decades, where planes predominantly rely on the judgement of the computers when flying. The development of artificial intelligence in planes has improved safely tremendously.

If today we had the same safety level as in 1970 a plane would crash every 15 minutes. This year till date only 363 people have been killed in 87 plane crashes. In 1970 2226 people were killed in 298 accidents. As you can see in the graph below the number of passengers has grown from 310 million in 1970 to nearly 4 billion in 2016.

 

So artificial intelligence is good. At least as long as it doesn’t take our jobs and offend our professional or emotional pride.

The fact is that many entry-level jobs are already being replaced by artificial intelligence. Law school graduates have troubles finding jobs at law firms because the work they used to do is done much better by computers. Hospitals are experimenting with having computer diagnosing patients instead of doctors and machines can already perform certain kinds of surgeries much better than we humans can.

Artificial intelligence is all good – or is it?

As it is easy to find the areas where artificial intelligence helps us making things easier, safer or quicker is slightly more difficult to see the negative side effects. An often – if we see them, we tend to downplay or even neglect them completely.

Deployment of artificial intelligence is like pressing toothpaste out of the tube. Once it is out you can’t get it back in. So I believe we have to carefully assess how far we are willing to go with the use of artificial intelligence. Just because we can go an extra step doesn’t mean we should necessarily do it.

I do certainly not neglect the positive effects of artificial intelligence when developed and used correctly, but below I will allow myself to be the devils advocate in assessing what artificial intelligence can do to a company culture if it gets out of hand.

Company culture and artificial intelligence

One of the general definitions of culture is “the way we do things around here”. A company culture is like any other culture. It is a collection of behaviours, values, norms and basic assumptions tied together with mutual trust and experience and a common view of the outside world, its opportunities and threats.

This very complex non-verbal inter-human interaction is crucial for us human beings. We are NOT rational creatures. We are emotional. We fall in love, we hurt other people in anger, we get jealous, we hate, we admire role models and heroes. We have a need for affiliation, we seek recognition and we define ourselves by how we are in relation to other people. These are basic human characteristics, which are not going to go away.

When we in Gugin facilitate a company cultural change we look into all these aspects plus a lot more. We look at what people dream of and what they fear.Â

More people have a fear of becoming redundant, a fear of being replaced by a computer. That fear leads to mistrust in the people around you, the management and the company itself.

If you don’t feel safe you change behaviour. and when you change behaviour you change the culture. And this is exactly what has been happening with some of our clients over the past couple of years.

The fear among the employees and middle managers is implicit but nevertheless very present because we can measure the change in behaviour. They are afraid of sharing knowledge. They are afraid of asking for help and this way reveal that they don’t know everything. That change in behaviour leads to decrease in quality, lower customer satisfaction, higher employee turnover and eventually lower profitability.

The artificial intelligence dilemma

The use of artificial intelligence creates a dilemma that all companies should be aware of and relate to.

If you don’t take advantage of the new technologies you will lose competitive advantage because some of your competitors will use the new technologies. They way they can produce and sell the same products or services cheaper in a better quality and delivered faster. So pretending the good old days won’t change is not a good strategy if you want to remain in business.

On the other side of the dilemma, you might lose the motivation of your most important asset – your employees ( and perhaps customers) if you deploy artificial intelligence and other automation technologies as fast and intensive as possible.

Last month we conducted a survey for an airport lounge, that has just implemented automatic boarding card scanners for its guests instead of being greeted by a human being from that particular airline. The airline implemented the automatic scanning of boarding cards to save money on having people sitting at the welcome desk.

We interviewed 600 passengers over 2 days. 78% of passengers would rather talk to a human being, and even wait a few minutes rather than scanning their boarding card themselves in order to get access to the lounge. It is because human interaction is fundamental to our well-being as human beings. As human interaction is becoming seldom in many places we value it even more. This is probably why 65% of the passengers we interviewed stated that the automated registration of them when entering the lounge will have a negative impact on their overall rating of the airline.
Previously we have seen similar figures when companies are trying to replace inbound call centres with automated solutions.

Deployment of artificial intelligence solutions is probably going to follow the same patterns.

Is Artificial Intelligence a threat or an opportunity for your corporate culture?

Book a thought-provoking Speech on Artificial Intelligence and Company Culture

What happens when the hero in the organisation is no longer a senior person but a computer? What happens when your boss tells you that he trust the computer more than he trusts you? What happens when you get fired because your job can be better done by a computer?

What can you do to use artificial intelligence wisely in your company?

We humans don’t like change – at least no when it concerns ourselves and it is not voluntarily

Based on our experience we suggest you do the following to prepare your organisation for the use of artificial intelligence:

•Make sure you have a company culture where everybody trust, feel, believe and experience that they are the most important asset to the company. When that is in place people are much more willing to change also in the transition towards wider use of artificial intelligence

•Try to make artificial intelligence initiatives be a bottom-up process. Not only do you get acceptance from the organisation you also get a lot of great ideas to how the culture can be preserved and developed while deploying new technologies. One of the law firms we have been working with did that and found out that the new graduates they hired could charge more money faster by using artificial intelligence. So they actually hire more new graduates than 5 years ago. They would never have reached that point if it was a process driven from the bottom up.

•Make a space where people can express their fears and concerns about the deployment of artificial intelligence. It has to be anonymous. People express concerns because the care, so take it seriously and address these concerns properly

•Make sure the transition process is very transparent and do make sure you maintain the highest level of integrity at all times. This is about trust. Integrity is the foundation for trust.

If you are interested in discussing this further please do get in touch here

 

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

A lot of people want to become a leader. This article is about why you most likely will fail to become a leader. The article is also about what you can do yourself to change that situation. But you will probably find it is much harder than you anticipated.

read more
Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership keynote speaker, Dr Finn Majlergaard delivers thought-provoking global leadership speeches and workshops all over the world, based on 25 years of experience with 600+ companies. Anyone can copy your product but no one can copy your culture. Learn to become the best in leadership

read more
Can you do too much for your employees?

Can you do too much for your employees?

We raise the question because we did a large survey for a client last month that gave some surprising results – results that will require some further research – for sure, but we will disclose the conclusions with you in this article.

We have anonymised the name and industry of the client, but they have given us permission to that we can disclose the results and conclusions as long as they can’t be traced back to the company. We are grateful for that permission, because we discovered something we have never seen before.

Background

Over the past 7 years the company has invested a lot in a new state of the art head quarter and they took the advice we gave them 5 years ago to develop and implement a motivation and reward system, that was on one hand totally individual and on the other rewarded team effectiveness and corporate culture development. They wanted and want their employees to feel happy. They wanted to ease their employees life as much as possible. The employees can order ready to go dinner they can bring home after work, there are spa facilities, there is an army of coaches ready to help with almost everything the employees want to talk about. The list of services is long.

The company made this investment because it wanted to attract and retain the best people in a very competitive market. And they have done very well. Maybe too well.

But people have started to leave and even the exit interviews don’t give a clear picture of the reason, so the company wanted us to assess their corporate culture again so see if we could identify the reason for why people were leaving. We did a cultural due diligence and compared it with the first one we made. No major differences were found.

Then we started to look for patterns and found that most people leaving were in a relationsship or married. All sorts of ideas came into our minds, so we decided to develop a survey we have never done before. We wanted the spouses of the employees to take a survey where we would ask about the work load, flexibility level, opportunities and benefits their spouses( the employees of the company) had. We also gave the opportunity to give free comments.

Here are the key results:

52% of the spouses found that their spouse spent too much time on work and had difficulties with prioritising the relations and the family.

34% of the spouses felt that they were in competition with the company in making the most pleasant and exiting life for the employee, so often the spouses felt that their spouse chose the company over them and the family.

Still 68% of the spouses were content that the company did so much for its employees.

Is it the relationship or the job?

So maybe the employees in a relationship leave because they can feel or have been explicit told that it is harmful to their relationship.

It is only a maybe as we want to research this further if other companies want to test their situation. Ideally we would like to have companies from different industries and different countries to work with. So if you are interested, please let us know.

Please share your experiences

Please share your experiences in the comment box below as we would love to get to the bottom of this and develop new knowledge in Gugin Research Unit

 

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

5 reasons you will never become a Leader

A lot of people want to become a leader. This article is about why you most likely will fail to become a leader. The article is also about what you can do yourself to change that situation. But you will probably find it is much harder than you anticipated.

read more
Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership Keynote Speaker by Dr Finn Majlergaard

Leadership keynote speaker, Dr Finn Majlergaard delivers thought-provoking global leadership speeches and workshops all over the world, based on 25 years of experience with 600+ companies. Anyone can copy your product but no one can copy your culture. Learn to become the best in leadership

read more

Why I always bring a hard case onboard a plane as hand baggage

Why I always bring a hard case onboard a plane as hand baggage

This is an article about how airlines are pleasing all the wrong passengers

I fly a lot. In Gugin we have a number of airlines and airports as clients, where we help them to figure out how to deal with the very diversified behaviour different cultures have when they are together in a very small space like an airport or airplane.

Despite being fairly tolerant, open-minded and flexible I have my limits. I have previously written about parents behaviour onboard a plane, which you can read here.

I am a very frequent flyer with Airfrance/KLM. Like all other airlines they have rules for how big your carry on luggage can be. Below you can see the regulations from Airfrance, which are similar to most other airlines I have looked at.

The problem is that a lot of people carry on a lot more luggage, either because they don’t know the rules, think they are more important than everyone else or because they know the airline will not reinforce its own rules.

This lack of respect and/or reinforcement of rules has a number of unfortunate side effects.

  • Boarding and de-boarding takes a lot longer time than necessary
  • The flight crew has to spend a lot of time and energy on moving around luggage in the overhead bins, as some people don’t care if they take up all space or if the door to the overhead bin can be closed. I often wonder why the flight attendents tolerate it.
  • People, who bring smaller and softer items are forced to have them under the seat in front of them, which means they have reduced or no space for their feet.

As we work with a number of airlines on customer behaviour we have asked them on several occassions, why they don’t reinforce their own rules. The answer we usually get is that they are affraid of offending the passangers and usually it works out anyway.

My answer to that is that it may work our from an operational point of view, but certainly not from a passanger point of view – at least not mine. Here is why:

I am usually loyal to the Skyteam family for a lot of reasons that ease my many days in airports and airplanes. One of the advantages I have is that I can board the plane first irrespectively of my travel class. I usually check in all possible luggage and only carry a small bag onboard with my laptop and other things I may need to have access to during my journey. Very often the following happens: I board the plane and put my bag in the overhead bin together with my coat . As the plane fills up the stewardesses start moving things around and sometimes take smaller items out and ask the owners to store it under the seat in front of them.

I feel offended when it happens to me. Firstly, I am not the one breaking the rules. Secondly what is the point in giving valued customers priority boarding if you throw their hand luggage in their face later?

And this is ONLY necessary because many fellow passangers take on too big and too much luggage. They are violating some very sensible rules and I (and others) are paying the price for it.

Is that fair?

I don’t think so, so I have changed behaviour in order to avoid having my limited space reduced because the airlines let passengers violating their own rules.

I bring on a small hard case as hand luggage instead of the soft bag I used to use. It has several advantages

  • The flight crew can not ask you to put it under the seat in front of you.
  • The content remain safe despite the oversized luggage being throwed into the bin by people with similar big egoes.

The airlines are pleasing the wrong people

The airlines are pleasing those who are breaking the rules. These are rules that make a lot of sense. When there is no reinforcement more people will break them – of course. It is basic human behaviour.

Because they are afraid of offending the big egoes with the big carry on luggage we get

  • Delayed flights
  • Flight attendents who do heavy lifting, which they shouldn’t do
  • Angry passengers like me. (I know I am not alone on this)
  • Slow boarding and de-boarding
  • Tense situsations in the cabin during boarding and de-boarding

Dear Airlines – please change!

Start pleasing the right passengers and reward the proper behaviour. You are doing it all wrong. In that respect the so-called low-cost carriers are doing it right. You should do it too, but in a different way.

If you need help for this transformation you know where I and my colleagues in Gugin are. It is after all our core competence to fix things like this.

Please share if you like

Gugin provide training for airlines and airports around the world on how to deal with different cultures and how to create a culture that improves customer service and efficiency. Please get in touch if you want to know more

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